1960 January 20

Danny Escobedo Arrested for Murder

 

Danny Escobedo was arrested and released on this day, and then rearrested 10 days later in Chicago. His arrest became the basis for the Supreme Court decision, Escobedo v. Illinois, decided on June 22, 1964, ruling that criminal suspects have a right to counsel during in-custody interrogations, under the Sixth Amendment. The decision was closely related to the landmark “right to counsel at trial” decision, in Gideon v. Wainwright, decided on March 18, 1963, and set the stage for the even more important decision on June 13, 1966, Miranda v. Arizona, in which the Court ruled that the police were required to advise suspects of their right to an attorney, and that if they could not afford a lawyer one would be appointed for them, and also that they have a right to remain silent when arrested.

Justice Arthur Goldberg for the Court: “ . . . no system of criminal justice can, or should, survive if it comes to depend for its continued effectiveness on the citizens’ abdication through unawareness of their constitutional rights.”

Learn more the police and the Supreme Court: Liva Baker, Miranda: Crime, Law, and Politics (1983)

Find a Day

Go
Abortion Rights ACLU african-americans Alice Paul anti-communism Anti-Communist Hysteria Birth Control Brown v. Board of Education Censorship CIA Civil Rights Civil Rights Act of 1964 Cold War Espionage Act FBI First Amendment Fourteenth Amendment freedom of speech Free Speech Gay Rights Hate Speech homosexuality Hoover, J. Edgar HUAC Japanese American Internment King, Dr. Martin Luther Ku Klux Klan Labor Unions Lesbian and Gay Rights Loyalty Oaths McCarthy, Sen. Joe New York Times Obscenity Police Misconduct Same-Sex Marriage Separation of Church and State Sex Discrimination Smith Act Spying Spying on Americans Vietnam War Voting Rights Voting Rights Act of 1965 War on Terror Watergate White House Women's Rights Women's Suffrage World War I World War II Relocation Camps

Topics

Tell Us What You Think

We want to hear your comments, criticisms and suggestions!