2010 July 19

Washington Post Begins “Top Secret America” Series

 

The Washington Post on this day began publishing a three-part series of articles on “Top Secret America,” by Dana Priest and William Arkin, arguably the first comprehensive investigation of the entire national security apparatus in the United States. The articles were later published as a book, Top Secret America.

The principal findings, which stunned many political observers, included: the number of people employed in the national security industry with “top secret” clearances was 854,000 — almost 30 percent of those people worked for contractors rather than the federal government itself, involving almost 2,000 private companies. The estimated cost was $75 billion, two and a half times what it was the day before the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the U.S. in 2001.

The revelations based on the National Security Agency (NSA) documents stolen and leaked by Edward Snowden provided a deeper look into one, but only one, component of the national security industry. See the first stories based on the Snowden documents on June 5, 2013.

Read the book-length version: Dana Priest and William Arkin, Top Secret America (2011)

Find a Day

Go
Abortion Rights ACLU african-americans Alice Paul anti-communism Anti-Communist Hysteria Birth Control Brown v. Board of Education Censorship CIA Civil Rights Civil Rights Act of 1964 Cold War Espionage Act FBI First Amendment Fourteenth Amendment freedom of speech Free Speech Gay Rights Hate Speech homosexuality Hoover, J. Edgar HUAC Japanese American Internment King, Dr. Martin Luther Ku Klux Klan Labor Unions Lesbian and Gay Rights Loyalty Oaths McCarthy, Sen. Joe New York Times Obscenity Police Misconduct Same-Sex Marriage Separation of Church and State Sex Discrimination Smith Act Spying Spying on Americans Vietnam War Voting Rights Voting Rights Act of 1965 War on Terror Watergate White House Women's Rights Women's Suffrage World War I World War II Relocation Camps

Topics

Tell Us What You Think

We want to hear your comments, criticisms and suggestions!